the true shades of plants…

As promised, some pictures of my dye adventure of the last weeks

coreopsis-tinctoria

dyed with coreopsis flowers Coreopsis tinctoria

iris-pseudacacorus-dye-and-illustration

dyed with yellow flag, yellow iris root Iris pseudacorus

grey on merino and alpaca silk, more like silver really, but pink-goldish on silk

liriodedron-tulipifera

dyed with tulip tree leaves Liriodendron tulipifera

sambucus-ebulus-daneberry

dyed with danewort or dwarf elder berries Sambucus ebulus

drying-skeins-natural-dyes

some drying skeins…

All these colours are the result of a fermentation technique, that is to say, it involves a long process where no additional heating is involved, no metal salts and no chemicals are added. All you need really are plants and patience. And a passion for botanics and colours of course. The results are not what most people are used to, no flashing but vibrant colours. It’s the original shades of plants. It’s a whole new approach to dyes but at the same time it’s very ancient. And it’s a very feminine path too if I may say so…

More soon…

I’m a dyer and I love it

growing dye plants

Here some Japanese Indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) which I won’t harvest this year I just let them grow to get seeds, I hope there will be many.

outdoor dye vats

These strange objects are my dye vats which I cover with black plastic to enhance temperature which is important if you want the dye liquid to ferment

testing all kinds of dye plants

Smaller fermentation vats with all sorts of strange plants, testing, always testing…

preparing the goldenrod dye vat

Starting a Goldenrod dye vat (Solidago virgaurea)

collecting seeds

Another one of my passions is to collect seeds, not only dye plant seeds but also wild plants, medicinal herbs and vegetables seeds